New guide shows the way when disaster strikes

Helping Hand issues guide with info on the steps to be taken when a loved one dies

Thinking about the demise of a loved one is never one’s favourite thought; yet, when tragedy strikes and you just don’t know what to do, the crisis is so much more intense. Solidarity Helping Hand therefore decided to compile a special manual which would contain all the vital information you’d need in such a time.

Such a situation suddenly demands that you attend to several matters at once. The Emergency Guide contains a list of things-to-do which could be an enormous help during such a difficult time. You may want to print it and keep it in a safe place together with all your other important documents. Make copies for your family and friends as well.

The guide explains in detail the things you should do, for instance the calls to be made, and the documents required. Situations where there are insufficient funds for the funeral, or when the deceased didn’t leave a will, are also explained. There’s even a complete list of emergency numbers which you may print and keep in a handy place.

Rene du Preez, Project Organiser with Helping Hand, says they regularly receive enquiries from traumatised family members who seem at a loss about priorities when a loved one has died. “The guide makes life a little easier in such very trying circumstances,” she says. “But trying as it is, it remains inevitable.”

Please click here to download the Emergency Guide.

For more information about the guide, or to pass on suggestions for other guides, kindly contact Rene du Preez at 012 644 4390 or [email protected].

 

 

 

New guide shows the way when disaster strikes

Helping Hand issues guide with info on the steps to be taken when a loved one dies

Thinking about the demise of a loved one is never one’s favourite thought; yet, when tragedy strikes and you just don’t know what to do, the crisis is so much more intense. Solidarity Helping Hand therefore decided to compile a special manual which would contain all the vital information you’d need in such a time.

Such a situation suddenly demands that you attend to several matters at once. The Emergency Guide contains a list of things-to-do which could be an enormous help during such a difficult time. You may want to print it and keep it in a safe place together with all your other important documents. Make copies for your family and friends as well.

The guide explains in detail the things you should do, for instance the calls to be made, and the documents required. Situations where there are insufficient funds for the funeral, or when the deceased didn’t leave a will, are also explained. There’s even a complete list of emergency numbers which you may print and keep in a handy place.

Rene du Preez, Project Organiser with Helping Hand, says they regularly receive enquiries from traumatised family members who seem at a loss about priorities when a loved one has died. “The guide makes life a little easier in such very trying circumstances,” she says. “But trying as it is, it remains inevitable.”

Please click here to download the Emergency Guide.

For more information about the guide, or to pass on suggestions for other guides, kindly contact Rene du Preez at 012 644 4390 or [email protected].

 

 

Cents for Students provide a future for communities

Helping Hand launches project to establish study funds in 175 towns and will double the fund rand for rand

Solidarity Helping Hand’s new study loan project does not require much; on the contrary, the project only asks for the small change in your wallet. The project aims to establish a fund in 175 towns to assist needy students in the area with a study loan.

Helping Hand has already placed money boxes with the Cents for Students logo at schools, businesses and shopping centres in which the public may throw their small change. The boxes will be available in all towns that have a Helping Hand branch until June.

“This project also helps to unite the community and to make them feel “part” of an initiative that can have a lasting impact and make a huge difference in the lives of many,” said Helping Hand Project Organiser, René du Preez. “The Study Fund Centre will also double every rand raised to a maximum of R25 000. We count every cent, because every cent counts DOUBLE!”

Helping Hand hopes that the project will generate enough funds from the community to assist a deserving child from the community with an interest-free study loan. With the assistance of a selection process, every town will have the opportunity to decide themselves which child should benefit from the fund.

In 2016, Helping Hand’s Study Fund Centre paid out more than R31 million to realise the dreams of 1 291 students.

For more information, contact René du Preez on 012 644 4390 or send an email to [email protected]

Solidarity Helping Hand highlights drug abuse amongst street beggars in shocking documentary

Graphic scenes highlight the reality of white street beggars’ motives

Solidarity Helping Hand’s new documentary, Bedwelmd (Drugged), highlights the harrowing world of drugs and the devastation caused by addiction to it. The documentary contains conversations with both current and recovering drug addicts and their loved ones, and graphically showcases the tragedy of drug addiction from begging on the streets to  the broken lives caused in its wake. Bedwelmd aims to make the public aware of the dangers thoughtless charity for beggars on the streets of South Africa.

In a qualitative study undertaken by Helping Hand, respondents claimed that up to 90% of white beggars are addicted to drugs. Experienced investigative journalist, De Wet Potgieter, took the camera crew into the dark underworld of drug abuse and addiction. The viewers can see firsthand what life is like on the streets and how the people try to escape from the cycle of addiction.

Interviewees include Ado and Michael Krige, the managers of House Regeneration Rehabilitation Centre, as well as Jacques Papenfus of Moeg Gesukkel Rehabilitation center. The documentary also includes conversations with rehabilitating and former drug addicts, as well as a couple anguishing over their son’s addiction.

Helping Hand’s 150 branches, including 250 staff, supporters and volunteers, stood on street corners and at traffic lights to beg with unconventional slogans on their signs. Helping Hand wishes to inform the public that in spite of the ludicrous messages on these pretentious signs, the public still gave them money.

“When the public gives money to beggars on street, there is a misconception that the money will be used to support their livelihoods. Sadly the public does not realize the damage they unwittingly cause in the lies of these street beggars,” said Dr. Danie Brink, chief executive at Helping Hand. “The graphic scenes in Bedwelmd aims to bring across the hard reality of drug addiction.”

The documentary was released at the Atterbury Theatre in Pretoria on 21 April. Helping Hand believes that donations should rather be given to trustworthy organizations who are committed to helping the poor. The organization urges the public not to give money to beggars as the money only feeds the beggar’s addiction. Helping Hand’s study showed that the majority of beggars need specialised help to treat their addiction.

For more information about the #geeREG campaign, please contact Lizelle Joubert, project leader at Helping Hand on 012 644 4390 of send an email to [email protected]

Be careful who you give money to….

Solidarity Helping Hand takes to the streets

Be sure to carefully read the messages written on the beggars board before deciding to give them a donation, it might be a member of Solidarity Helping Hand you encounter. The organization is aiming to educate the public on the dangers of toxic charity with a new campaign. On 18 – 20 April more than 300 of the organization’s staff, supporters and volunteers will take to the streets all over the country with unconventional messages on their boards.

Helping Hand wants to make the public aware that even with these unconventional messages, people still give money. In 35 towns will form part of the #geeReg project and boards will display messages like “my drug dealer thanks you for your donation”.

Solidarity Helping Hand will soon take to South Africa’s streets to refute once and for all the misconception that exists in the country about beggars. Through its #geeREG campaign the organisation will on 19 April 2016 communicate the urgent message of giving in the right way to the public.

Based on a qualitative study undertaken by Helping Hand among rehabilitated drug addicts, the organisation contends that donations should rather be made to reliable institutions that focus on supporting the poor. The organisation wants to urgently appeal to the public not to give money to beggars.

“When members of the public give money to beggars on the street they do so under the impression that the money would be used for necessities such as food and clothing. Few people, however, realise that damage is being done by giving money to beggars because it is usually used for drug abuse,” Lizelle Joubert, project organiser at Helping Hand said.

This huge project goes hand in hand with the launch of the documentary Bedwelmd at the Atterbury Theatre in Pretoria on 21 April. The documentary features interviews with rehabilitated drug addicts and their loved ones and it brings this tragedy right into the viewer’s living room. The documentary is aimed at making people aware of the dangers of giving money without thinking to beggars.

Solidarity Helping Hand’s new documentary, Bedwelmd, exposes the horrific world of drug addiction and the havoc addiction wreaks. The documentary features conversations with rehabilitated drug addicts and their loved ones, which bring this tragedy right into the viewer’s living room. The documentary is aimed at raising awareness of the dangers of giving money without thinking to beggars.

Helping Hand conducted a study on the habits of beggars in Pretoria. The study indicates that the majority of addicts want help to stop their addiction but that they need specialised help.

Based on the study Helping Hand is of the opinion that donations to reputable organisations are of greater value to beggars and addicts than giving money to beggars at traffic lights. Reputable organisations are able to make a lasting difference.

For more information about this project, visit www.geereg.co.za or speak to Lizelle Joubert on 012 644 4390 or send an email to [email protected]